In this clip Pulitzer Prize winner (and Oscar nominee this year for "Lincoln") Tony Kushner praised David France's Oscar-nominated documentary How to Survive a Plague while discussing the legacy of his Angels in America: 

HOW TO SURVIVE A PLAGUE is the story of two coalitions--ACT UP and TAG (Treatment Action Group)—whose activism and innovation turned AIDS from a death sentence into a manageable condition. Despite having no scientific training, these self-made activists infiltrated the pharmaceutical industry and helped identify promising new drugs, moving them from experimental trials to patients in record time. With unfettered access to a treasure trove of never-before-seen archival footage from the 1980s and '90s, filmmaker David France puts the viewer smack in the middle of the controversial actions, the heated meetings, the heartbreaking failures, and the exultant breakthroughs of heroes in the making. 

 
 
Malcolm Ingram's lively new documentary CONTINENTAL takes viewers back in time to the sexually charged New York of 1968, when the notorious Continental Baths opened its doors. This groundbreaking den of debauchery (advertised as a place “for sophisticated men only”) came to transcend sexual identity and became a cultural beacon to the hip, beautiful and infamous. Not only host to newly-empowered gay men of all shapes and sizes, eager to take full advantage of their sexual freedoms at a lavish venue, the Continental brought both high and low culture to the bathhouse's stage week after week, becoming instrumental in the careers of ‘60s and ‘70s icons like Bette Midler, Barry Manilow, Patti LaBelle, Peter Allen and countless others.

With the help of its owner and proprietor, the enigmatic Steve Ostrow (along with his former staff, historians and artists who were there), CONTINENTAL tells the tale of one of the most important keystones in the sexual revolution, one that fostered an environment of tolerance and contributed to a level of mainstream gay acceptance and uncensored sexuality the likes of which have never been seen since.

“Continental” premieres at SXSW on Sunday, March 10th.
 
 
In this advance clip from next Monday's edition of "Anderson Live," AIDS and gay rights activist Peter Staley and host Anderson Cooper discuss David France's Oscar-nominated documentary How to Survive a Plague as an invaluable educational tool for young LGBT people, as well as an inspiring model for activism and motivating any sort of positive change. The episode will air Monday at 12:00pm EST / 1:00pm PST.

About Peter Staley
Peter Staley has been a long-term AIDS and gay rights activist, first as a member ofACT UP New York, then as the founding director of TAG, the Treatment Action Group. He served on the board of the American Foundation for AIDS Research (amfAR) for 13 years and then founded AIDSmeds.com, an educational website for people living with HIV. Staley is a leading subject in the Oscar-nominated documentary How to Survive a Plague

About "How to Survive a Plague" 
HOW TO SURVIVE A PLAGUE is the story of two coalitions—ACT UP and TAG (Treatment Action Group)—whose activism and innovation turned AIDS from a death sentence into a manageable condition. Despite having no scientific training, these self-made activists infiltrated the pharmaceutical industry and helped identify promising new drugs, moving them from experimental trials to patients in record time. With unfettered access to a treasure trove of never-before-seen archival footage from the 1980s and '90s, filmmaker David France puts the viewer smack in the middle of the controversial actions, the heated meetings, the heartbreaking failures, and the exultant breakthroughs of heroes in the making.