Newark Valley, NY, February 18, 2013 – Many of us know someone whose family is dealing with autism; once considered rare, now 1 in 88 children in this country are diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

Silently Seizing:  Common, Unrecognized and Frequently Missed Seizures and Their Potentially Damaging Impact on Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorders (AAPC Publishing) by Caren Haines, RN, and valuable input by Nancy Minshew, MD, deals with the overwhelming challenge for those living with silent seizures. Many are confronted by anger and falsely accused of disorderly conduct, indecent exposure and drug abuse; while some are even unfairly arrested because the bizarre actions exhibited during a seizure have led to frequent misdiagnosis, medical mismanagement and, in the worst case, commitment to a mental institution.

Because they are difficult to diagnose, or due to a lack of awareness and understanding, as many as 30% of all children and young adults with ASD may have undiagnosed seizure disorders. Silently Seizing is a breakthrough book that explores what most doctors won't tell you – that often the symptoms of autism are caused by seizures, undetectable with standard diagnostic tools.

At age 2, the author’s son was diagnosed with autism. By the time he was 12, his diagnosis didn't account for his uncontrollable aggression, the acrid smells that lingered in his mind and the odd voices that screamed at him from inside his head. By the time he was 18, his out-of-control behavior mirrored a mood disorder with psychotic features. Silently Seizing begins with a close-up look at this family's journey and examines a disorder that cannot always be identified in a clinical setting.

As a registered nurse, Caren Haines relied on her training to help her decipher her now 24-year-old autistic son’s perplexing behaviors. Based on knowledge gained from years of intensive research and information from top researchers in the field of autism, she is helping families become free from the debilitating symptoms of silent seizures and psychosis.

Haines’ says, “Intersecting at two medical subspecialties, neurology and psychiatry, the child who has autism and partial seizures is at a serious disadvantage. By inadvertently allowing children's brains to “silently seize,” we are robbing them of their ability to function normally. Untreated, these seizures can predispose children to develop behavioral disturbances, such as self-injury, aggression and psychosis, which are seen in many cases of autism. If they are treated early with anti-seizure medications, many children show amazing gains in expressive language and comprehension. More importantly, many children lose their diagnosis of autism.”

Backed by up-to-the-minute research, Silently Seizing: Common, Unrecognized and Frequently Missed Seizures and Their Potentially Damaging Impact on Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorders is a must-read book that includes sections describing autism, the seizure-autism connection, tips for diagnosing and treating seizures, as well as how to better understand children's behavior. It acts as a virtual guide to help parents navigate through this complex and mystifying disease. For more information, please visit: www.bit.ly/Rb2WBW.
 
 
Psychologist Offers 4 Tips for Maintaining Balance in Difficult Times

It’s no wonder nearly one in 10 Americans suffers from depression. “Top risk factors include being unable to work or unemployed; having no health insurance; suffering from obesity,” notes psychologist Gregory L. Jantz, citing a Centers for Disease Control study.

“Unfortunately, those topics have dominated headlines for the past five years. What’s worse, by 2020, the World Health Organization estimates depression will be second most debilitating disease worldwide.”

The author of “Overcoming Anxiety, Worry and Fear,” (www.aplaceofhope.com) says these negative emotions along with sustained, excessive stress can lead to depression, which now overshadows other  problems for which patients seek help at his clinic.

“Depression can be rooted in a number of problems, and those need to be addressed – simply taking a pill is not usually effective treatment. Anger, fear and guilt can all be underlying causes, even when the person isn’t aware he’s experiencing those feelings.”

A holistic treatment approach, which may or may not include medication, helps people overcome a bout of the debilitating illness, and learn techniques to manage it themselves, he says.

People at risk of depression can work at maintaining their emotional equilibrium by counterbalancing negative feelings with optimism, hope, and joy. This is most effective if they do this holistically, addressing the four main categories of human need.

“By purposefully feeding the intellectual, relational, physical, and spiritual aspects of your life positive emotions, you can achieve balance,” Jantz says.

He offers these suggestions:
• Intellectual: Be aware of what you’re feeding to your mind. Try reading a positive, uplifting book, and setting aside time in your day to fill yourself up intellectually with constructive, encouraging messages. Be aware of what you are reading and listening to, and seek to counter the negative input we all get with positive influences.
• Relational: Think of a person you really enjoy talking to, someone who makes you feel good about yourself or someone who’s just fun to be around. Plan today to spend time with that person this week, even if it’s just for a moment or two. Make the effort to verbalize your appreciation for his or her positive presence in your day.
• Physical: Physical activity is a wonderful way of promoting emotional health. Engage in some mild exercise this week. Take a walk around the neighborhood. Stroll through a city park. The goals are to get your body moving and to allow you to focus on something other than yourself and your surroundings. Greet your neighbors, stop at the park and watch someone playing with his dog, or cheer at a Little League game. Intentionally open up your focus to include the broader world around you.
• Spiritual Support: Take some time to nourish your spirit. If you are a member of a religious organization, make sure to attend services this week. If you are not, listen to some religious or meditative music. Spend time in quiet reflection, meditation, or prayer. Intentionally engage in an activity that replenishes and reconnects your spirit.

If you are not depressed but feel anxious and stressed, have trouble sleeping or find your not content much of the time, Jantz says it’s time to start taking care of yourself.

“Depression is painful and as debilitating as any other disease,” he says. “Take steps to de-stress your life and to work on emotional balance before it gets worse.”

About Gregory L. Jantz, Ph.D
Gregory L. Jantz has more than 25 years experience in mental health counseling and is the founder of The Center for Counseling and Health Resources, near Seattle, Wash. The Center, “a place for hope,” provides comprehensive, coordinated care from a treatment team that addresses medical, physical, psychological, emotional, nutritional, fitness and spiritual factors involved in recovery. He is the best-selling author of more than 20 books, including “When Your Teenager Becomes…The Stranger in the House.” If you’re concerned you or a loved one may be depressed, visit www.aplaceofhope.com and click the “Are You?” tab for a self-evaluation.

 
 
In honor of National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, this infographic poster was created to highlight the facts about the impact HIV/AIDS has on black men who have sex with men. You can help raise awareness by sharing this infographic on Facebook, Tumblr, and Twitter.
 
 
photos (L to R) : Duane Cramer, App and Mondo Guerra

HIV Treatment with New Interactive Digital Tools

by David Cohen

In observance of National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness DayMerck  announced on Thursday, February 7, 2013, that Duane Cramer, an acclaimed photographer and HIV advocate, will be joining the national HIV education campaign named I Design. 

Duane has partnered with Project Runway star Mondo Guerra, who served as the voice of the campaign in 2012. The new campaign  geared  to help people living with HIV to find way to work with their doctors and to approach their treatment of HIV "through their own lens" said Duane.  These interactive digital tools will help HIV people to manage their life better and make evryday an easy day to bare. You will be able to find these tools on www.ProjectIDesign.comwhere you can download a conversation checklist. This list will offer you tips on how to engage your Dr. in an open and honest conversation, by designing a digital textile illustration to your approach of managing your HIV.

There are few apps that can help you manage your health: “My Health Matters” and “My Positive Agenda” for mobile and for desktop. These easy-to-use tools help you track the symptoms of your HIV, set up reminders to take your medications on time, and keep a record of when you have taken them, which can serve to prompt you on important discussion points when you are with your doctor. 

“As a person who has lived with HIV for a long time, I’ve learned that self-expression is incredibly important, especially when it comes to working with my doctor on a treatment plan,” said Cramer. “I am thrilled to join Merck and Mondo on the I Design campaign and to be kicking off the second year of this successful initiative on National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day.  I look forward to helping people living with HIV understand the importance of an open and ongoing dialogue with their health care provider to manage this chronic disease.”

An internationally known photographer, Duane has lived with HIV for nearly two decades.  He is also a passionate activist for HIV awareness and education, particularly for the African-American community, who are disproportionately affected by the disease.  Since being diagnosed as HIV-positive, HIV has become his artistic lens, no matter the subject.  Some of his most rewarding work, through his photography and his personal life, comes from bringing attention to African-Americans living with HIV. 

For additional tips and to follow Merck, Mondo, and Duane’s collaboration on I Design, join them on Twitter: @Merck, @LoveMondoTrasho, and @DuaneCramer.
 
 
As New Year's resolutions go into full swing, you may notice fewer patrons at restaurants and more frequent visitors to gyms and health food stores. Healthy living is no longer an inconvenient chore. High quality products are available online and can be delivered quickly straight to your front door, including vegan cleanses for jumpstarting healthier eating. 

Kaeng Raeng is one of several natural products now focused on lower prices, and thorough customer service it can be shipped and delivered to consumers in only 2 days, or you can buy it at the Whole Food stores. Kaeng Raeng provides the benefits of cleansing in the 21st century, and all you have to do is add water!  You'll receive 3 packets per day (9 or 18 total) of the detox program you choose. 

Kaeng Raeng is an all natural dietary supplement made in the US.  It is not recommended for pregnant women, women who are nursing, anyone with a history of eating disorders, or any customer under the age of 16.  None of the statements on the  Kaeng Raeng packaging has been evaluated by the FDA. Kaeng Raeng is not meant to treat, prevent, or cure any illness or disease.  For more info visit www.kaengraeng.com.  Cost: $69.99