by Provincial Tourist Board Cadiz, Spain

The Feast of Corpus Christi also known as Corpus Domini, is a Latin Rite liturgical solemnity celebrating the tradition and belief in the body and blood of Jesus Christ and his Real Presence in the Eucharist. It emphasizes the joy of the institution of the Eucharist, which was observed on Holy Thursday in the somber atmosphere of the nearness of Good Friday.

The date for celebration is not fixed. It varies according to the date of Easter. In 2013 Corpus Christi will be celebrated on the 30th of May. The most common way of celebrating Corpus Christi is a procession through cities and towns. But each place has some other traditions that accompany the procession.

Everywhere you turn you can't miss the aromatic smell the heather or eucalyptus. The cities and towns at the the Sierra de Cádiz mountains in the southern part of Spain are preparing to host the Corpus Christi festivities. These festivities have been celebrated  since the 15th century as a national holiday. In the city Zahara de la Sierra every building façade, alleys and corners, are decorated with ton of flowers and sedge, and a gilded repository studded with emeralds is processed through the streets. This year the Sunday of Corpus Christi will take place on June 2, 2013.

The festivities in Zahara are know for their decoration, especially for their decorated streets.  On Friday, a large group of volunteers set out to look for sedge that is used to cover the floor of the main street,  and on Saturady people use eucalyptus branches, heather, oleander and different aromatic plants to cover the façades of the buildings. 

On Sunday, the day of Corpus Christi, locals start showing off their decorating skills at 7 am in the morning. They decorate the building façades and the balconies with all the plants they have collected. Everyone is helping the the residents who live on the main street, while they all enjoying the flavor of the festivities. 

The religious side of the day culminates with the Mass and the procession of the Repository made out of gilded silver and emeralds, but the spotlight is on the children who celebrate their First Holy Communion.  

Under the open-air, on Saturday the festival features a local band performing under the marquee which is set up by the Town Council.  The music continues until the early hours of that Monday morning. On the second day of the celebrations a traditional contest is taken place. The contest is all about making the best "cachiporras" a unique instrument made out of sedge that will have the best aesthetics and loudest sound, which will receives a cash prize.  

With only 17 kilometers away from Zahara de la Sierra in the small village of El Gastor, locals use music as the main feature to celebrate these festivities which go back in time to the days of the pagan to the era of Al-Andalus. 

In El Gastor, the activities begin on Friday May 3rd, when a group of over 200 people are sent to the city of El Cuervo (Seville) to  look for sedge. People start decorating the streets at 7pm on Saturday evening, until the early hours of the morning.  The oleander and branches of eucalyptus, poplars and black poplars are collected by the town’s inhabitants, even though the Council is entrusted with distributing the greenery to those local residents who didn't help. 

As the city transform into a true green forest for the weekend the city of El Gastor is ready for the celebrations which end with a contest of Gastor bagpipe a native instrument on Sunday evening. This contest has attracted the attention of the bagpipe players of Galicia, a different region of Spain. Although it is a requirement to be a local, in previous years few Galician bagpipe players took part in the contest and were able to play the famous bagpipe instrument. 
 
 
Travelers weigh-in on common air travel dilemmas such as: rude recliners, armrest hogs, nonstop talkers, screaming children and personal space invaders.

Plymouth, MN (May 13, 2013) – For most, traveling by air is a very casual affair – long gone are the days of dressing up; also often absent are clear rules of etiquette, particularly when airplanes are flying full. So, in a nationwide survey, Travel Leaders Group asked Americans across the country how they would handle uncomfortable – yet fairly common – air travel situations. Nearly 70% of flyers would say something directly to the passenger in front of them if their personal space was “invaded” with an article of clothing and/or someone’s hair, but almost half (48.9%) would sit quietly and say nothing if they were stuck in a middle seat and had no access to either armrest. The series of “What would you do?” travel dilemma questions were part of a survey conducted by Travel Leaders Group – an $18 billion powerhouse in the travel industry – from March 15 to April 8, 2013, which includes responses from 1,788 consumers throughout the United States.

“As their travel agent experts, we hear directly from our clients who share similar complaints regarding their experiences.  In our survey, we wanted to know how many travelers proactively take some sort of action to resolve those situations,” stated Travel Leaders Group CEO Barry Liben.  “Based on the response to our ‘What would you do?’ questions last year, we knew there was more we needed to examine at this year.  So it’s particularly telling that over 77% of those polled would take some sort of action, if the person in front of them reclined so much that the survey participants were unable to lower their tray table or perhaps unable to open up a laptop. Based on the limited space available to each passenger, we are all trying to navigate the best approach.  This information also allows our travel agent professionals to assist their clients in setting expectations and offering solutions that will help all travelers when faced with these common dilemmas.”

Key Statistics and Findings
Q;  If you are seated in the middle seat on an airplane and the people on either side of you staked out the armrests, what would you do? 
Say something directly to your seat mates.  27.9%
Call a flight attendant and let him/her handle the situation.  2.6%
Sit quietly and say nothing.  48.9%
Not sure.  20.6%

Q; If the person in the airline seat in front of you invaded your personal space with an article of clothing and/or their hair so it was directly in front of you, what would you do? 
Call a flight attendant and let him/her handle the situation.  9.3%
Sit quietly and say nothing.  13.0%
Not sure.  8.8%

Q: If the person in the airline seat in front of you reclined their seat so much that you were unable to lower you tray table or perhaps unable to open up a laptop, what would you do? 
Say something directly to the person.  55.4%
Call a flight attendant and let him/her handle the situation.  21.8%
Sit quietly and say nothing.  15.1%
Not sure. 7.7%

Q; If the person in the airline seat in front of you ignored crew member instructions to have  their seat back upright for takeoff and/or landing, what would you do? 
Say something directly to the person.   13.4%
Call a flight attendant and let him/her handle the situation.   28.1%
Sit quietly and say nothing.  50.1%
Not sure.   8.4%

Q; If you were on a flight next to a person who insisted on trying to talk to you the entire flight, what would you do?
Use a book or other reading materials to try to limit the conversation.  38.1%
Put on headphones and use a book or other reading materials to limit conversation.  18.9%
Engage them in conversation for the whole flight.  12.2%
Specifically let that person know that you would prefer not to talk.  10.4%
Put on headphones to try to limit the conversation.  8.7%
Pretend to sleep try to limit the conversation.  7.4%
Put on headphones and pretend to sleep.  4.3%

O: If you were on a flight with someone who talked so loudly that half the plane could hear them, what would you do?
Say something directly to the person.  14.4%
Call a flight attendant and let him/her handle the situation.  27.9%
Sit quietly and say nothing.  36.0%
Not sure.  21.7%

O: What would you do if it appeared parents of a screaming child aboard a plane were not making any attempt to comfort/control their child? 
Say something directly to the person.  7.9%
Call a flight attendant and let him/her handle the situation.  46.7%
Sit quietly and say nothing.  30.6%
Not sure.  14.8%

Source: Press Release Travel Leaders Group